Newsletters

Is the Navy Responsible for Exposing Military Personnel to Asbestos?

In the midst of the 20th century, the U.S. Navy saw asbestos as a cheap and effective way to insulate and fireproof the ships that would soon see action in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. Asbestos was installed in ships, aircraft and facilities until the mid 1970s, long after the harmful effects of the fibers had been discovered. Navy veterans from several decades are still struggling with the harmful effects of asbestos exposure, including mesothelioma, lung cancer and throat cancer. An Asbestos Lawyer Explains If you think you’ve sustained an injury or illness because of your service on a Navy ship, you should consider speaking to an asbestos attorney about your rights and options for legal action. Dangerous Asbestos on Ships The Mesothelioma Center estimates that U.S. navy service members were exposed to much more asbestos than any personnel in any other military branch. This…
Read More »

11 workers missing after expolsion on oil platform

Eleven workers are still missing after a massive explosion aboard an oil platform off the Louisiana coast. In addition to the missing, 17 workers were injured — four critically — and evacuated to hospitals onshore. The remaining 111 people who were on the offshore platform “Deepwater Horizon” when the explosion occurred have been safely evacuated to Port Fourchon, La. They were checked by doctors before being brought to a hotel in suburban New Orleans to reunite with their relatives. According to an Associated Press report, rescue crews had covered the 1,940-square-mile search area by air 12 times and by boat five times, by Thursday morning. Officials hoped the 11 missing workers might have been able to get to a covered lifeboat with enough supplies to survive for an extended period. The rig, owned by Transocean Ltd., was under contract to oil giant BP and was doing exploratory drilling about 50…
Read More »

Chinese Auto Maker Widens Recall Related to Asbestos-Containing Car Parts

On Aug. 30, China’s largest car exporter, Chery Automobile Co., expanded a vehicle recall in Australia to include five other countries where asbestos-containing auto parts are believed to have gone. The initial recall issued on Aug. 16 included 23,000 vehicles in Australia. Now, an estimated 18,875 Tiggo and A3 models in Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, Argentina and Singapore are also subject to the recall. The recall was initiated after customs authorities in Australia detected asbestos in engine and exhaust gaskets. According to Bloomberg Businessweek, at the time of the Australian recall, Chery indicated that workers had erroneously used a batch of auto parts not intended for Australia-bound vehicles. A spokesperson for the company who commented on the expanded recall said, “The same supplier that provided the parts for the cars made for Australia also mistakenly provided us parts containing asbestos that went into these other cars.” He did not identify the…
Read More »

Navy Veterans and Asbestos Exposure

The shipbuilding industry widely used asbestos before the U.S. government began severely limiting its use in consumer products. The fire retardant nature of asbestos made it ideal for insulating boilers, steam pipes and hot water pipes, making it useful in engine rooms and superstructures. Asbestos, linked to several diseases including mesothelioma, throat cancer and lung cancer, remains an occupational hazard in numerous industries. Given the previously-widespread use of asbestos in shipbuilding, Navy veterans are one group at high risk for asbestos-related illnesses. Veterans diagnosed with an illness that may have been caused by asbestos exposure may be entitled to compensation and can learn about their legal rights from an experienced asbestos attorney. Navy personnel who worked in boiler and engine rooms with asbestos-containing materials, rooms typically characterized by tight spaces and poor ventilation, may have endured routine exposure to airborne asbestos fibers during their period of service. Inhaling these fibers…
Read More »

Pfizer to Pay Close to a Billion Dollars for Asbestos Claims

Pharmaceutical giant Pfizer was recently ordered to pay close to one billion dollars to individuals and families affected by the company’s asbestos-containing products. After a legal battle that has lasted years, workers affected by mesothelioma and other lung conditions have finally won the compensation they need to pay for ongoing medical care, lost wages and other injustices they have suffered. The ultimate tragedy about mesothelioma and asbestos-related diseases is that in most cases, these diseases were preventable. Businesses cannot value profits over the health and lives of its own workers, and when they do, they must answer to the workers and the public for such gross acts of negligence and recklessness. The Pfizer Case and the Ongoing Effects of Asbestos Exposure Legal action was brought against Pfizer due to its ownership of Quigley Co., a refractory that was acquired by Pfizer in the 1960s. After years of declining asbestos use,…
Read More »

Does Smoking Increase Mesothelioma Risk?

It is an unfortunate fact that many people who historically worked around asbestos also smoked cigarettes. Smoking cigarettes was the norm throughout the second half of the twentieth century, and it was not until relatively recently that the public became aware of the extreme health risks of cigarettes. According to a recent study by the Cancer Center of Amsterdam, smoking increases the risk of developing mesothelioma or other lung cancers for individuals who were subjected to asbestos exposure. “The risk of development of lung cancer was higher for anyone with increased years of exposure to asbestos fiber combined with a smoking habit,” said one of the lead researchers. While smoking tends to cause different forms of lung cancers than asbestos exposure, research indicates that the dual presence of tobacco-related carcinogens and asbestos has a multiplicative effect. How Does Smoking Increase Mesothelioma Risk? Mesothelioma is caused by the inhalation of asbestos…
Read More »