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Asbestos Found in Old Airport Terminal

In January, plans to demolish the old terminal at Barnstable Municipal Airport on Cape Cod had to be put on hold after the crew found what they suspected was an asbestos contamination during demolition preparation. Asbestos had previously been discovered in the 50-year-old air traffic control tower back in November, prompting airport officials to ask the town council for $365,000 from the airport’s reserves for asbestos abatement services. This latest discovery could add another $200,000 to the airport’s total asbestos removal tab. According to Airport Manager Roland “Bud” Breault, the funds “should be 100 percent reimbursable through a grant from the FAA.” A 2005 inspection apparently missed the asbestos contamination in the older buildings. Town Manager Tom Lynch said the city was “aggressively searching all records to find the answer as to why these additional suspect materials were not originally identified and subsequently included in the construction cost.” In both…
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Breaking Mesothelioma Treatments Show Promise

Our Asbestos Lawyers Examine Therapy Solutions Every year, close to 3,000 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma caused by asbestos exposure. Even with the advances of modern medicine, the treatment options for mesothelioma are severely limited. The standard treatments for this cancer – surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation – take a tremendous toll on the patient, and can cause additional harmful effects. However, scientists are developing a new way of dealing with the disease that uses the body’s own immune system. Immunotherapy Offers Brighter Future for Mesothelioma Patients A British company called Immunocore has recently signed agreements with pharmaceutical giants Roche and GlaxoSmithKline to develop a promising cancer treatment that uses the body’s T-cells to destroy cancerous growths. T-cells are a special kind of white blood cell that helps the body defend itself against disease and aid in destroying invader bacteria. Though these cells are powerful, they “are not very keen at…
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11 workers missing after expolsion on oil platform

Eleven workers are still missing after a massive explosion aboard an oil platform off the Louisiana coast. In addition to the missing, 17 workers were injured — four critically — and evacuated to hospitals onshore. The remaining 111 people who were on the offshore platform “Deepwater Horizon” when the explosion occurred have been safely evacuated to Port Fourchon, La. They were checked by doctors before being brought to a hotel in suburban New Orleans to reunite with their relatives. According to an Associated Press report, rescue crews had covered the 1,940-square-mile search area by air 12 times and by boat five times, by Thursday morning. Officials hoped the 11 missing workers might have been able to get to a covered lifeboat with enough supplies to survive for an extended period. The rig, owned by Transocean Ltd., was under contract to oil giant BP and was doing exploratory drilling about 50…
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Asbestos Is a Risk Factor in the Type of Lung Cancer that Killed Joe Paterno

Legendary Penn State football coach Joe Paterno died of metastatic small-cell lung cancer at the age of 85 on Jan. 22. Paterno was a nonsmoker, prompting many people to wonder what caused his cancer. According to an article on Newsmaxhealth.com, about 15 to 20 percent of male lung cancer patients and up to 50 percent of female lung cancer patients are nonsmokers, and of the 150,000 lung cancer patients who die in the United States each year, as many as 24,000 of them have never smoked. As reported by Newsmaxhealth.com, Dr. Eduardo Oliveira, head of interventional pulmonology and chief of medicine at Cleveland Clinic Florida, says the following factors are the top causes of lung cancer in nonsmokers: Radon gas Second-hand smoke Asbestos exposure Air pollutants Cooking fumes in poorly ventilated kitchens Genetics When discussing Paterno’s death, Barbara Campling, an oncologist at Thomas Jefferson University’s Kimmel Cancer Center, told the…
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When Contractors Fail to Protect Their Workers from Asbestos

Our Mesothelioma Attorneys Fight for Justice The citizens of a town in northern Wisconsin recently expressed concerns about the effects a newly proposed mine will have on the health of their community. Recent ore samples taken from the site were tested and shown to contain a substance called Grunerite, which is similar to the hazardous material asbestos. Without this test, it was likely that employees of the mining company would have begun work on the site, potentially exposing themselves to the harmful substance and serious health risks. Companies have a responsibility to extensively survey an area before constructing anything on a site. Unfortunately, they often spend much of their time ensuring that the project will be profitable, and may fail to determine if the area will be safe for their workers. In particular, many companies fail to make sure that their workers will not suffer from the effects of serious…
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Why is Surgery Not Available for Certain Mesothelioma Patients?

Asbestos Lawyers Discuss a Shocking Study A study involving more than 1,500 peritoneal mesothelioma patients was recently made public by Surviving Mesothelioma, and revealed the shocking fact that nearly 62 percent of its participants failed to receive surgical treatment when they need it. This means these patients unnecessarily lost out on years of survival. For far too many mesothelioma patients, surgical treatment options exist—but are not being made readily available. While the advantages are obvious, surgery is often simply not being offered. “You can see the missed opportunity here,” said one doctor. “Surgery is a really good option. But I think too often, it’s not being…recommended.” Pulling from almost forty years’ worth of data, surgical oncologists at the Medical College of Wisconsin examined survival statistics for peritoneal mesothelioma patients diagnosed between 1973 and 2010. According to their findings, those patients who received surgery as a treatment lived an average of…
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