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The Nassau Coliseum Mesothelioma Lawsuits

Asbestos Lawyers Discuss the Implications Last month, a group of over 100 industrial workers filed a lawsuit against Long Island’s Nassau Coliseum, alleging that they suffered mesothelioma cancer and other respiratory conditions due to asbestos exposure. The lawsuit alleges that current and former stadium employees, including independent contractors, were negligently exposed to asbestos and other hazardous materials over their decades of work at the crumbling stadium. This case comes almost a year after OSHA cited the arena on 16 different violations of workplace safety standards, many of which were related to asbestos exposure. The levied fines came close to $88,000. Will the Nassau Coliseum Complaints Become a Class Action Lawsuit? Although it is not a class action lawsuit at this time, the workers harmed may be certified as a class, whereby the individual complaints will be consolidated into one case. The lawsuit seeks damages between $500 million to $1 billion….
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Occupations with a High Risk of Mesothelioma

The September 2010 edition of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine contains the results of a study on specific occupations and their mesothelioma risks. The study, conducted in France, confirms that shipbuilders, construction workers and those involved in asbestos manufacturing and its products have the highest risk of developing mesothelioma. For over 50 years, asbestos was widely used in industries all over the world for its fire resistant capabilities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed guidelines to protect workers in an attempt to prevent asbestos-related diseases and other industrial cancers. Currently, the EPA limits the amount of time that employees can work in asbestos-containing areas. Jobs With A High Risk of Mesothelioma Researchers conducted the four-year study from 1998 to 2002 and focused on pleuralmesothelioma, which is the most frequently diagnosed form of mesothelioma. Pleuralmesothelioma attacks the lining of the chest cavity around the lungs. Inhaling asbestos fibers causes…
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Breaking Mesothelioma Treatments Show Promise

Our Asbestos Lawyers Examine Therapy Solutions Every year, close to 3,000 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma caused by asbestos exposure. Even with the advances of modern medicine, the treatment options for mesothelioma are severely limited. The standard treatments for this cancer – surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation – take a tremendous toll on the patient, and can cause additional harmful effects. However, scientists are developing a new way of dealing with the disease that uses the body’s own immune system. Immunotherapy Offers Brighter Future for Mesothelioma Patients A British company called Immunocore has recently signed agreements with pharmaceutical giants Roche and GlaxoSmithKline to develop a promising cancer treatment that uses the body’s T-cells to destroy cancerous growths. T-cells are a special kind of white blood cell that helps the body defend itself against disease and aid in destroying invader bacteria. Though these cells are powerful, they “are not very keen at…
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Shipbuilders High Risk of Asbestos Exposure

Since the 1940s, millions of workers in the United States have been exposed to asbestos dust, increasing their risk of developing cancer and other asbestos-related diseases. Shipyard workers are one of the most affected occupational groups by asbestos exposure. Estimates put the number of shipyard workers during World War II at around 4.5 million people, when shipbuilding was at its peak and asbestos was still being widely used. Given that health complications can arise years—even decades—after asbestos exposure, millions of shipbuilders continue to be at risk ofasbestos-related illness and death. When a shipbuilder develops cancer, like mesothelioma, following asbestos exposure at work, a qualified asbestos lawyer can help fight for compensation on his or her behalf. According to an article published by the Ulster Medical Society, during World War II, asbestos use averaged 783 million pounds. By the Cold War, its use had exceeded 1,400 million pounds, decreasing only after…
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Railroad Workers and Asbestos Exposure: Our Mesothelioma Lawyers Discuss the Risks

Resistant to both heat and fire, asbestos was once widely used in the railroad industry. Train manufacturers relied on asbestos for insulation and used it in brakes, clutches, pipe fittings, boilers, and steam plants. Current and former railroad workers may have been exposed to asbestos if they worked with train parts manufactured before the 1980s. Inhaling asbestos fibers can lead to the development of mesothelioma, lung cancer, throat cancer and other serious health problems decades after exposure. In June 2012, five former railroad workers sued BNSF Railway Company over allegations that occupational asbestos exposure caused their lung diseases. The former workers claim that BNSF managers knew about the dangers of prolonged asbestos exposure and failed to warn employees. Some of the plaintiffs dedicated more than 30 years to the railroad. According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, “the plaintiffs said they worked in and around engines, boilers, railroad tracks and other…
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Common Themes Between Asbestos and the BP Oil Spill Health Risks

The damage to the environment and health hazards that the BP oil spill caused dominated the news during much of 2010. The numbers associated with the disaster demonstrate just how catastrophic it was: Between the start of the spill on April 20, 2010, and the official sealing of it on September 19, 2010, 185 million gallons of crude oil leaked into the Gulf of Mexico. At the start of November 2010, spill responders had collected nearly 7,000 dead animals. The oil spill threatens 400 endangered species and affects all of the 8,332 species that live in the environment where the spill occurred. Nearly 30,000 people have been involved in the cleanup effort. Cleanup workers and residents in the Gulf area felt the health effects of the spill within weeks of its start. Long before BP successfully closed the leak, residents complained of dizziness, vomiting, nausea, headaches and chest pains. The…
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